Anna Borgman went to culinary school before she became a hunter. She studied the relationship between how an animal was raised to how it tasted on the plate. The same is true for game — a sense of place imparts itself onto every animal harvested. This episode, we talk about the art of butchery, and delve into some practical tips — like which knives you need and how to handle silverskin.

  • 2:30 – May 29 “So You Think You Wanna Fish?” webinar with Artemis
  • 8:00 – Shooting stars! Paint brushes! Lupine! Oh, my! That lovely point when you know your local wildflowers by name… it bolsters your sense of place
  • 10:00 – iNaturalist citizen science app; plus Seek app, which uses your phone to identify plants
  • 10:30 – Anna of Forage Fed teaches butchery and does game processing, and she’s also into how food systems work
  • 13:00 – Portland Meat Collective with Camas Davis – whole animal butchery for chefs
  • 15:00 – Cricket protein farming… yup.
  • 16:30 – Entomophogy = bugs for food
  • 17:50 – Butchery versus meat-cutting
  • 20:00 – Why does meat look different on older vs. younger animals, or how does meat quality change depending on how an animal has been raised?
  • 20:30 – Fred Provenza’s work on how animals meet their own nutritional needs instinctually
  • 25:00 – How animals are fed affects so much else… land use, public land health, etc.
  • 28:00 – There’s no single right way to butcher an animal. The two golden rules, however, would be ‘clean’ and ‘cold’ — below 45 degrees is ideal
  • 30:00 – Gloves can help you handle that meat without your hands going numb.
  • 31:00 – You don’t need an expensive knife. You just need a sharp knife. Anna uses the Victorinox ones… totally affordable.
  • 32:00 – Knife arsenal: you need a boning knife (maybe two, depending on stiffness preference), a paring knife, and a butcher knife. A grinder is also pretty handy
  • 34:00 – Being a woman at ‘sausage school’ and laughing like a teenager at all the punny jokes
  • 35:00 – Cleaning silver skin, which is the connective tissue that lines muscles (it also dulls your knives and clogs your grinder)
  • 40:30 – Subbing whitefish in a crabcake recipe
  • 42:00 – Meat color/toughness has to do with how muscles are used for movement (and something called myoglobin)
  • 49:00 – Good books to start out with: Adam Danforth’s books on beef and other animals; MeatEater’s guide to field processing 
  • 53:00 – You can’t mess it up. Really! Just get in there and cut up the animal. You get better every time.
  • 56:30 – In the field, try to keep your knife hand clean. One hand for pulling hide and swatting hair, one for clean meat-handling.
  • 57:30 – a bone dust scraper
  • 59:00 – dry-aging & flavor
  • 1:06:00 – Bear fecal plugs, ya’ll
  • 1:07:00 – Find Anna at forage-fed.com, or @annaborgman on Insta