Peeing, pooping and periods. Oh yeah, we’re “going” there. The founder of Kula Cloth, Anastasia Allison, joins us to talk about how to do all three of these things comfortably in the backcountry. Do you ‘drip dry,’ or ‘shake it off’? What about if you pop a squat and notice a trail cam pointed at you? 

  • 1:30 – ‘Snain’ – snow up high, rain down low
  • 4:00 – unannounced sunrise concerts in the backcountry, courtesy of a packed in keyboard and violin
  • 4:45 – going from working in parks, to becoming a police officer, to entrepreneurship – Kula Cloth is a non-microbial cloth that helps you “go” wherever you need to
  • 8:30 – On stealing toilet paper from another camper’s backpack, and realizing you don’t actually know HOW to go potty in the woods
  • 11:45 – PEEING. Drip dry? Or, the ‘aggressive shake-off’?
  • 12:00 – It’s important to stay dry and clean in the backcountry. Otherwise you’re looking at chafing, UTIs, or plain old discomfort
  • 13:00 – When peeing, be mindful of water sources nearby. Try to be 200 ft away
  • 13:30 – How to pee? There are all kinds of ways. There’s the trusty ‘ol squat, or if you’re in a climbing harness or drysuit, products like the SheWee or TinkleBell or SheFly pants.
  • 14:45 – Even if you shake off after peeing, you’re probably still going to have some residual moisture
  • 16:00 – Description of a toilet bag
  • 17:00 – Kula Cloth and other pee cloths are there to help you pat dry
  • 18:00 – Caring for a pee cloth on a long backpacking trip
  • 23:45 – POOP. That moment when you ask for the trowel and everybody knows where you’re going
  • 25:00 – You should be packing out toilet paper. Is it awkward shoving it in a clear ziplock bag and toting it to and from camp? Yes. One tip: Cover your poo baggie with duct tape.
  • 26:00 – Digging a 6- to 8-inch hole sounds super easy, but it doesn’t feel quick when you really need to go. You can pre-dig a hole as soon as you set-up camp.
  • 27:00 – Nobody wants to show up to a campsite with a bunch of small rock shrines, which are actually just small poop temples for people who didn’t bother to dig a hole.
  • 28:00 – Toilet paper doesn’t just disappear, especially in desert and alpine environments
  • 28:30 – “Blue bag” areas – places where you’re regulated to pack out your poop. (Also a good idea to be blue-bagging in snow-camping situations.)
  • 30:00 – Blue-bagging can feel a little weird. It’s like picking up dog poop, but you are the dog.
  • 30:30 – go2 Outdoor Essentials
  • 32:00 – “CuloClean” squirt nozzle for water bottle
  • 33:00 – On husband-wife intimacy when it comes to poo in the backcountry
  • 38:00 – Burning toilet paper – yay or nay?
  • 39:30 – PERIODS. 
  • 40:30 – Menstrual cups, like Diva Cup and Pixie Cup. If you’ve ever thought of trying one, the ease of having your period in the backcountry is a huge perk.
  • 41:45 – If you use tampons/pads, you’re going to need to pack out the spent ones, preferably keeping them alongside your food so they’re not a wildlife attractant.
  • 47:30 – South entrance to Yellowstone… the notorious sign, “Bears and Menstruation.” It’s scaring everybody!
  • 48:30 – What’s the evidence on bear attacks being correlated to periods? Not much.
  • 48:45 – “Night of the Grizzlies” book
  • 50:00 – Worst thing ever: Popping a squat and then seeing a trail cam pointed at you
  • 57:00 – Knockin’ rainbows on the Snake for a Fish and Game bounty
  • 1:00:01 – Toilet paper shortage has been really serendipitous for Kula Cloth